• Book Review,  Reviews

    The Diamond Thief – Sharon Gosling

    “Remy took a deep breath as she stood on the edge of the narrow plunge board. Above her, the old material of the big tops roof was close enough to touch. Below her was nothing at all but air dirtied by dust and tobacco smoke, and then, sixty feet below, arranged around the sawdust of the circus ring, there was the crowd. She could almost hear their silence, the collected indrawn breath of five hundred people.” As the finale of the circus show Remy is used to capturing the show, used to the attention. But up on the trapeze covered in greasepaint she feels like she can fly away and…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    Goblin Secrets – William Alexander

    “Rownie woke when Graba knocked on the ceiling from the other side. Plaster dust drifted down from the knocking. Graba knocked again. Baskets hung on chains from the rafters, and they shook when she knocked.  Rownie sat up and tried to blink sleep-sand and plaster dust from one eye. The whole floor was covered by a bed made up of straw, stolen clothes sewn into blankets, and sleeping siblings.” Rownie barely remembers a time when he wasn’t one of Graba’s many grandchildren. Before that he lived with his mother and his older brother, but when his mother drowned in the vast Zombay river, Rownie and his brother were taken under…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    Tall Tales From Pitch End – Nigel McDowell

    “Bruno Atlas didn’t speak, didn’t scream, only thought wuth eyes shut tight and a mind full of crimson fireworks: This is it and I’ll be gone soon. I’ll not be here any more. I’m going to die.  He heard his mother –  ‘Bruno! I can’t see or get to ye! We have to get out before the whole place goes up!’” Bruno Atlas was just five turns old when his house burned to the ground and he had to say goodbye to his father – the last Pitch Ender to die at the hands of the rebels. Ten turns on and Bruno is a young man, about to embark on…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    The Peculiar – Stefan Bachmann

    “Feathers fell from the sky.  Like black snow, they drifted onto an old city called Bath. They whirled down the roofs, gathered in the corners of the alleys, and turned everything dark and silent, like a winters day.  The townsfolk though it odd. Some locked themselves in their cellars. Some hurried to church. Most opened umbrellas and went about their business. At four o’clock in the afternoon, a group of bird catchers set off on the road to Kentish Town, pulling their cages in a cart behind them. They were the last to see Bath as it had been, the last to leave it.” In the Faery slums of Bath,…