• Book Review,  Reviews

    Who Framed Klaris Cliff – Nikki Sheehan

    “We were talking about the old days, and I remembered the weirdest things. Like people calling them ‘friends’. And how they said they were good for your brain. Some families even laid a place for them at dinner.  Then I thought about the day it changed. The day Shorefield happened.  It was on TV. A newsflash cut through the kids’ programmes. We saw the victims being rolled out on trolleys, their faces covered over. A camera zoomed in on a small hand dangling from underneath a sheet.” Joseph had never been good at imagining things, he was good at Maths and Science, not creative things like Art and English. Which…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    Waiting For Gonzo – Dave Cousins

    “Listen, G – this is important and there isn’t much time. I want you to know what really happened, because things weren’t supposed to end like this. I blame Michael Duchamp, but he’s dead, so there’s not much anybody can do to him now. When he drew a moustache and a goatee beard on a copy of the Mona Lisa – which is probably the most famous painting in the world – he said he did it becuase he wanted to challenge people’s perception of what art could be. He was lying. He did it because if was funny. Moustaches are funny. End of Story  Except in this case, G.…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    15 Days Without a Head – Dave Cousins

    “The front door slams. Mum’s back. It sounds like a dead body hitting the ground as she dumps her stuff in the hall and goes straight to the kitchen. I hear the thud of a bottle on the table, the crack of the cap, then the slow glug as liquid spills into a glass.” Laurence knows his mum has a problem, but he does the best he can to make sure life isn’t too bad for him and six year old Jay. today is Tuesday, and his mum is in her happy hour, that one hour of good drunk when she will humour Jay and not shout at Laurence, but…

  • Book Review,  Reviews

    Roscoe’s Leap – Gillian Cross

    “Stephen walked along the gallery with the Daily Telegraph under his arm, a bottle of milk in one hand and half a pound of frozen mince in the other. His trainers were almost silent, padding from diamond to daisy to diamond n the elaborate parquet floor. But no one would have heard him if he had run across in hobnailed boots. The noise of the water drowned out everything else.  For Hannah Roscoe’s Leap is just the huge, decaying house where she, her brother and her mother live. She spends all her time tinkering with the old mechanics of the house and trying to get a straight answer out of…