Fever Pitch – Nick Hornby

I’ve just (finally) finished Fever Pitch. Its only 247 pages long and I have been reading it since last Monday. That’s a stupidly long time for a short book like that.

I have trouble reading non-fiction, I’m not gunna lie. I often find it boring and just want to escape into a world that’s strange to me. However Fever Pitch is strange to me. It’s about football… I’m not a football fan. In fact I hate football; anyone who knows me will tell you that! I have a strange fondness for my home town, Darlington, but other than that I refuse to watch or listen to any thing to do with football.
Of course this was a problem with picking up this book. Some of you may ask why I even bothered trying to read it. My boyfriend has spent the past couple of days telling me to put it down and read something else whenever I’ve complained about the book going on for too long. So why did I put myself through this? Because I love Nick Hornby.
I fell in love with Nick Hornby when I read High Fidelity, then became infatuated with him once id read About a boy and the amazing A Long Way Down (fave book!!) So I want to read everything Nick has ever written. That is why I put up with Fever Pitch.
Due to my severe dislike of football I found myself switching off in places when it goes into details of matches and stuff. The writing is brilliant, as with all Hornby’s books in my opinion, but too much detail of football will make me switch off and then become confused when he’s suddenly talking about real life experiences which aren’t to do with football. I found myself having to skip over the past few paragraphs a few times but that is due to my attention span not the writing!
I knew I wasn’t going to like this book anywhere near as much as other Hornby novels. I knew that I’d find it difficult to read as it’s about football and what’s more it’s about football between 1969 and 1991, I wasn’t even born until 1988!! But I found myself strangely enjoying certain bits of the book. I found it interesting to hear about the Hillsborough disaster, which I’d heard of so much but never really heard about, if you get me. The book also opened my eyes to the way I always assumed that to like books and music you had to hate football. This is really not the case and something Hornby does mention in the book.
As I say, I love Nick Hornby’s work. I would never say anything bad about it because of my love for it, the love for his characters that I have developed may be stronger than any other characters I’ve read about! And I will always, always recommend Hornby to people who haven’t read his work. But I’m afraid I wouldn’t recommend Fever Pitch to anyone unless I knew for a fact they love football. It’s difficult to get through when you have no interest in the subject, (that goes for any book no matter how well written it is!) and you find yourself missing some of the importance because you don’t understand football terms and such.
Overall the book is great, but only if you can handle a lot of football